Medical Help For Injured United States Forest Service Workers In Texas

Dallas Medical Clinic Helping Injured Forest Workers

The United States Forest Service employs almost 35,000 people across the country, from wildfire management officials, to administrators, law enforcement officers, and scientists. While Forest Service employees accomplish a wide and diverse range of tasks each day, each and every worker shares the singular goal of protecting, managing, and preserving our precious lands and the wildlife that lives there. At the same time, each and every Forest Service worker also carries a risk of injury on the job, whether they spend their days working at a desk or patrolling the woods.

Comprehensive Medical Care For Injured Federal Employees

At Work Injury MD, we are committed to helping injured federal employees, including U.S. Forest Service employees, recover from their ailments, regain their strength, and return to their jobs protecting the land and exploring our world. Our board-certified doctor and the rest of our experienced staff concentrate only on worker injuries, giving us the unique ability to recognize specific injuries, as well as create treatment plans for those injuries.

To begin, we can help you answer common questions about your on-the-job injury, including:

  • How did my injury take place, and how can I prevent similar injuries in the future?
  • How do I file a Department of Labor Office of Workers’ Compensation Program (OWCP) claim?
  • What medical information do I need to file a workers’ comp claim?
  • How can I better manage the chronic pain I have in association with my injury?
  • Could I need surgery in order to recover from my injury?
  • How can I get a second opinion regarding my work injury?
  • My last doctor couldn’t help – where can I turn to work toward recovery?

We understand how stressful, frustrating, painful, and overwhelming a work injury and its consequences can be, from getting the right diagnosis for your conditions to getting on the road to recovery. We also understand the wide variety of injuries sustained by various Forest Service workers, depending on your role with the organization. Let us help you through this tough time by offering our experienced, compassionate care, and services.

To schedule an appointment with our physician, to ask our staff a question about your injury, or to learn more about what we do, please fill out our quick contact form.

Unique Injury Risks For Unique Forest Service Jobs

As you might expect, some members of the Forest Service have more hazardous jobs than others. But what you might not know is that all Forest Service workers are at risk for injury, whether they are studying the science of avalanches in Alaska, fighting fires in Idaho, or completing statistical analysis at a desk in Maryland. Below, we will examine some of the common injury risks for four of the most common types of Forest Service workers in the United States:

  • Firefighters and wildfire management officials.

Managing forests means managing forest fires during the hot and dry summer months. Across the country, the United States Forest Service employs over 10,000 firefighters to make sure that fires are contained and controlled – and not spreading to residential areas outside of the forest’s’ borders.

Unfortunately, firefighters have one of the most dangerous and injury-prone jobs in the country. Not only do they face enormous blazes that can cause extremely serious injuries (such as burn injuries, fallen tree injuries, and smoke inhalation injuries), but they also have very physically demanding jobs that can lead to overuse and overexertion injuries including back injuries, shoulder injuries, and neck injuries. Finally, firefighters are susceptible to transportation accidents as they work hard to access the deepest parts of the woods – in the past, they have been injured or killed in truck, plane, and helicopter accidents.

  • Law enforcement personnel.

In addition to firefighters, the Forest Service also employs over 700 law enforcement officers. These personnel are charged with protecting the forest and upholding rules and regulations that help make certain that the woods and its inhabitants are preserved and respected, while the visitors to the lands are law-abiding and respectful of both nature and others.

Law enforcement officers are subject to a unique set of risks, especially those who work with the Forest Service. Not only must they deal with perpetrators and others who might pose a physical threat to their safety, but they also work in an environment that poses a number of natural hazards as well, such as fire, flooding, water hazards, exposure, and more. Some of the law enforcement officers that we see at our clinic have suffered an acute injury, such as a fall, a transportation injury, or an assault, while others complain of chronic injuries caused by overuse and repetitive motion, such as back injuries from repeatedly lifting equipment or foot injuries from extended hours of walking.

  • Scientists and researchers.

Although many are unaware, the Forest Service employs about 500 scientists across the country who contribute a large body of work to the world regarding the natural wonders of our forests. While one scientist might focus on grizzly bear populations in Montana, another might focus on forest fires, while another might focus on pine beetles. But all researchers and scientists help us learn more about our environment and increase the general knowledge of our species.

Forest Service scientists and researchers often split their time between being in the field and being in the office to analyze their data. This makes them privy to the full spectrum of common worker injuries: Both injuries that plague physical laborers and injuries that plague office workers. Outside in nature, scientists are exposed to natural dangers that include falls, falling trees, exposure, sudden storms, wildfires, avalanches, dehydration, and flooding. In addition, they may be injured in transportation accidents or by lifting heavy equipment. Inside the office, scientists may suffer from more mundane but still serious threats, such as falls and lifting injuries. They may also develop health conditions due to poor posture, improper sitting, and repetitive stress.

  • Administrators.

The Forest Service also employs a significant number of administrators and office workers who not only keep the organization moving in the right direction toward its goals, but also keep its operations running smoothly on a day-to-day basis. While these administrators are not on the physical front lines of caring for our nation’s public forests, they are integral in protecting our lands and learning from nature. In the same way, although administrators do not spend the majority of their on-the-job time outdoors, they are still susceptible to a certain number of injuries and accidents.

The most common types of accidents for administrators are falls, motor vehicle accidents, and falling objects accidents. Even when they take place in an office environment, these accidents can result in injuries that both keep the administrator from work and affect their daily life – such as head, back, and knee injuries.

The most common types of injuries for administrators are repetitive stress injuries and overuse injuries. These injuries could be the result on a non-ergonomic desk environment, too many repetitive motions, improper lifting, or a lack of desk breaks. These injuries could manifest as tendonitis, carpal tunnel syndrome, or bulging discs, and should be treated by a doctor as soon as symptoms appear.

Contact Our Work Injury Doctor Today And Start The Healing Process

Whether you spend your days as a U.S. Forest Service employee who tromps through the woods wearing a hardhat and hauling equipment, or whether you spend your days as a U.S. Forest Service employee who works in a traditional office environment, getting injured on the job can have serious consequences for your health, well-being, and career. A minor injury can be a setback that causes you to miss work and tally a significant number of medical bills, while a serious injury could throw your job and finances into peril on a long-term basis.

At Work Injury MD, we know the important role that Forest Service employees have in preserving the most beautiful places in our country – and we know how devastating, stressful, and painful an on-the-job injury can be. Our full-service clinic and staff physician offer a caring, professional environment where injury victims can recover and heal, one day at a time. Our clinic offers:

  • Medical evaluations
  • Diagnostic testing
  • Acute care
  • Medications and prescriptions
  • Pain management
  • Physical therapy
  • Physiotherapy
  • Surgery

In order to return to your job in a timely manner, and prevent future injuries, it is imperative that you care for your health with the help of a knowledgeable work injury doctor at a medical facility that is familiar with workplace health conditions.

We welcome you to visit our clinic for a consultation and get back onto the road to recovery. To schedule an appointment, to ask a question about your injury, or to learn more about our clinic, please fill out our contact form, located on our Contact Us page. When we receive your form, we will get back to you as soon as possible.